(FR) Choisir l’administration publique: 30 lettres pour une jeunesse sceptique. Presses de l’Université du Québec, 2018, 239 p.

There is an important gap in connecting skilled prospective public servants to opportunities within government institutions. Most students across various fields of studies have questions or uncertainties about their future careers. Even those studying public administration may still be on the fence about choosing the public service amidst all the criticism surrounding it. IPAC, for example, aims to fill this gap with the organisation of yearly events, such as speed mentoring events or workshops for students and new public servants. These events connect students with public servants to answer burning questions, such as: What should I know about the human resource processes? What kinds of skills should I develop to be a good public servant? What kind of job opportunities exist in the public service? What different departments exist, what are their differences and which one should I choose?

(ENG) Choisir l’administration publique: 30 lettres pour une jeunesse sceptique. Presses de l’Université du Québec, 2018, 239 p.

There is an important gap in connecting skilled prospective public servants to opportunities within government institutions. Most students across various fields of studies have questions or uncertainties about their future careers. Even those studying public administration may still be on the fence about choosing the public service amidst all the criticism surrounding it. IPAC, for example, aims to fill this gap with the organisation of yearly events, such as speed mentoring events or workshops for students and new public servants. These events connect students with public servants to answer burning questions, such as: What should I know about the human resource processes? What kinds of skills should I develop to be a good public servant? What kind of job opportunities exist in the public service? What different departments exist, what are their differences and which one should I choose?

Canadian Multimodal Transport Policy and Governance

Canadian Multimodal Transport Policy and Governance. McGill-Queens University Press, 2019. 448pp, with index.   By G. Bruce Doern, John Coleman and Barry E. Prentice   Review by Anthony Perl Professor of Urban Studies and Political Science Simon Fraser University     It has been half a century since Canadian policy researchers took a deep dive … Continue reading Canadian Multimodal Transport Policy and Governance

Digital Transformation at Scale: Why Strategy is the Delivery. London Publishing Partnership, (2018)

Across the globe, the traditional practices of public administration are faced with the challenge of adapting to an increasingly digital society. This is not a new problem. The state has steadily lagged behind leading practices in technological adoption for decades but with the increasing pace of technological innovation and adoption elsewhere, government risks falling steadily further behind. With public health crises like the COVID-19 pandemic forcing the public administration to adopt digital practices in the absence of the analog and in-person work-arounds that have long substituted for meaningful digital adaptation, in 2020, chickens have come home to roost.

Democracy in Canada: The Disintegration of Our Institutions. McGill-Queens University Press, 2019. 504 pp, with index.

Donald Savoie is worried about Canada. He argues that Canadian representative democracy may appear robust when compared with other democracies but is besieged by a democratic deficit rooted in the history and creation of Canada. He sets out to prove that this path leading towards democratic failure can only be altered if we realise that our institutions have drifted too far from fundamental democratic values and principles to reverse themselves.

Shaping the Metropolis: Institutions and Urbanization in the United States and Canada McGill-Queens University Press, 2019. 472 pp.

‘Urban governance’ may imply that governance in urban metropolitan cities is confined to local governments and actors. Zack Taylor’s analysis, however, illustrates that the urban is not necessarily at the centre of urban governance at all. In fact, it is the upper levels of government that dictate governance in cities. Taylor illustrates the differences in the regulation of urbanization processes, and argues they are not random or accidental. In fact, such differences are the result of deliberate actions and unintended consequences of upper levels of government that have structured government resources and capabilities. Different developmental paths have set diverging systems of multi-level urban governance.

Opening the Government of Canada: The Federal Bureaucracy in the Digital Age. UBC Press, 2019. 312 pp.

In Opening the Government of Canada Clarke takes us beyond the rhetoric of digital, and provides a compelling discussion of the need for more openness, while also balancing open with accountability, equal treatment of citizens, and public service neutrality. The book adds much to the public administration literature, but also invites scholars in information management and information systems to think about how their theories and practices can add to the discussion. Her call to invest in digital talent, literacy and infrastructure advocates for a modern interdisciplinary approach to government transformation.

Aboriginal Peoples and the Law. A Critical Introduction. Vancouver: UBC Press/Purich Books. 2018

What is Aboriginal law? What is its purpose, sources, and justifications? How is it linked to the history of Aboriginal-state relations in Canada, to the trajectory of federal and provincial Aboriginal policy making, and to Canada’s constitutional structure? These are the core questions taken up in Jim Reynolds’ Aboriginal Peoples and the Law. Reynolds provides a clear and highly readable summary, and critical analysis, of Canadian law as it pertains to Aboriginal and treaty rights, self-government, Aboriginal title, the duty to consult, and to both Indigenous and international sources of law.

Negotiating Business Narratives: Fables of the Information Technology, Automobile Manufacturing, and Financial Trading Industries, Palgrave-Pivot, p. 60

How do you know how to behave when you have to do some kind of business in a place and with people you do not know, say, a military base, a manufacturing plant, a scientific laboratory, or a technologically sophisticated start-up? You go to the only references available: books, movies, TV shows. You draw upon the residues of popular culture portrayals of the environment in question. It may not be perfect, but it is all you have.

Constructing Policy Change: Early Childhood Education and Care in Liberal Welfare States. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2017. 334 pages.

In this scholarly work, White seeks to explain the reasons behind fundamental shifts occurring in early childhood education and care policy in Canada and the United States and why these two countries lag behind other advanced democracies; not just to Sweden or France, as might be expected, but kindred liberal welfare states such as Australia and the United Kingdom.